Monthly Archives: October 2012

FOSDEM CrossDesktop DevRoom 2013 – Call for Talks

FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributorsin the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium). One ofthe tracks will be the CrossDesktop DevRoom, which will hostDesktop-related talks.

We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-sourceSoftware on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applicationsand interoperativity amongst Desktop Environments. This is a uniqueopportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technicalaudience.

Topics accepted include, but are not limited to: Enlightenment, Gnome,KDE, Unity, XFCE, Windows, Mac OS X, general desktop matters,applications that enhance desktops and web (when related to desktop).

Talks can be very specific, such as developing mobile applicationswith Qt Quick; or as general as predictions for the fusion of Desktopand web in 5 years time. Topics that are of interest to the users anddevelopers of all desktop environments are especially welcome. TheFOSDEM 2012 schedule might give you some inspiration:
https://archive.fosdem.org/2012/schedule/track/crossdesktop_devroom.html

Please include the following information when submitting a proposal:

  • Your name
  • The title of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will belisted with around 250 from other projects)
  • Short abstract of one or two paragraphs
  • Short bio
  • Requested time: from 15 to 45 minutes. Normal duration is 30minutes. Longer duration requests must be properly justified.

The deadline for submissions is December 14th 2012. FOSDEM will beheld on the weekend of 2-3 February 2013. Please submit your proposalstocrossdesktop-devroom@lists.fosdem.org(subscribtion page for themailing list:https://lists.fosdem.org/listinfo/crossdesktop-devroom)

– The CrossDesktop DevRoom 2013 Organization Team

PS: Qt and KDE people are starting to organize for the booth, devroom, Saturday & Sunday night, etc. If you want to help, join kde-promo and add yourself to the wiki.

 

On HTML5 and native

A few months ago I wrote on my disbelief of HTML5 being the right tool for everything. Some people took that as me saying HTML5 is useless.

That’s obviously not true and it’s certainly not what I think.

It’s my opinion there is room for HTML5 and there is room for native applications and the decision on what to use should not be taken lightly.

Here are a few questions that may help you to make a wise decision.

 

Target user

Is it corporate? Is it consumer?

Corporate devices are usually under control and users may not be able to install software.

Or traffic may be filtered and users cannot browse to your website to use your webapp and getting the authorization will take months, therefore they give up before they have even started using it.

Or they may be on a slow Internet connection and using that HTML5 webapp that took years to develop and add all those nice effects is hardly possible due to megabytes of JavaScript and images needing to be downloaded.

As for consumers, despite having full control of their systems, it’s not roses either: not all consumers know how to install software and/or they may be scared by UAC dialogs (hint: always sign your software with a certificate whose signature chain reaches VeriSign).

 

Target device

Is it a computer? Smartphone? Tablet? Web browser?

If a computer, is it a PC running Windows? Linux? Mac? All of them?Are you trying to reach as many platforms as possible?

How old of a computer are you targeting? Pentium 4? Core 2 Duo? Core i5? How much RAM? Try a fancy website with a lot of HTML5 niftiness on an old computer and you’ll probably be surprised at how slow HTML5 can be, even on modern browsers.

 

Deployment

Deploying native applications in corporate environments is a bit of a nightmare due to different operating system versions, hardware, etc

Deploying native applications in consumer computers is only a problem if you are targetinglow-skilled users.

HTML5 is easy to deploy, provided that you can get the user to use a proper version of the browser. This is workable with consumers but often impossible with corporate, so if you go for HTML5 for a corporate application, make sure you support everything from at least down to Internet Explorer 8.

For mobile devices (smartphones and tablets), it doesn’t really matter whether it’s an HTML5 or native application: it has to be installed on the device, the device goes with the user everywhere and when the user moves to another device, re-installing all the applications is a matter of accessing the Apple Store, Android Market or equivalent and say “download it all”.

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